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water heaters maintenance - Mesa, AZ

Why You Should Hire a Plumber, Not DIY

By plumbers No Comments

If you want to ensure your home’s plumbing runs at maximum efficacy, hire a reputable plumbing professional for all of the work you need to be done.

We’ve all had those gut-wrenching moments when a waterline burst or our toilet didn’t flush; It happens. When it comes to plumbing, some repairs and replacements can be extremely complex with a high risk of making the problem even worse. For example, replacing a broken inch and a quarter copper waterline; a repair of this caliber requires certain tools and specialized training. Although costs for hiring a plumber can be steep at times, it’s worth it to have a difficult job done right. Let’s go over some key reasons on why you should leave your plumbing to the professionals.

Specialized Training

Professional plumbers are experienced and trained in identifying and fixing a variety of plumbing problems, which means there’s nothing they haven’t dealt with or know how to fix. Plumbing problems require specialized tools like a flaring tool, strap wrench and pipe cutters. You could hire a professional who already has the specialized tools and specific training necessary to complete almost any repair. You don’t want to risk destroying your plumbing or worst off, injuring yourself.

It Could Ruin Your Home

Major plumbing jobs, such as moving bathroom fixtures or swapping a bathtub, can go horribly wrong if you don’t know what you’re doing. If you don’t get everything properly installed and tightened, you can end up with a leak, possibly one that goes unnoticed for ages until it weakens a wall to the point of a catastrophic rupture. Of course, that would also be true if a plumber hired by you made the same mistake, in that case, the plumber would be at fault and would have to pay for the damage. It’s best to leave it to the professionals for the sake of your home and your sanity.

Detailed Diagnostics

An enormous big benefit of hiring a plumber is that you are going to get a very detailed diagnostic report. There are many plumbing problems that the layperson wouldn’t be able to identify. A professional who is well trained can find the problem’s cause and give you a detailed report. Plumbers can check your whole system so that they can find any problems.

Another key benefit of hiring a professional plumber is that you’re given a detailed diagnostics report. A highly-trained professional will be able to locate the source of the problem and provide you with a comprehensive diagnostic report.

Permanent Solutions

When you call a professional plumber, you are going to have someone who can offer you a permanent solution to your plumbing issue. If you hire a competent, professional plumber, you shouldn’t encounter the same problems again. If you are remodeling or adding new construction to your home and you need projects completed in your kitchen or bathroom, a professional is the best option to mitigate the risks of doing it all yourself.

As you can see from what we just went over, you should leave the plumbing to the professionals. Plumbing is a very complicated process that requires years of training and on the job experience. If you want to ensure your home’s plumbing runs at maximum efficacy, hire a reputable plumbing professional for all of the work you need to be done.

Hire a reputable plumbing professional for all of the plumbing work you need to be done.

This article was written by Nina Wells from Clearwells. She has over 10 years’ experience in writing health related topics and specializes in the health benefits of saunas and hydrotherapy.

City Wide Plumbing Co. Responds to COVID-19 (coronavirus)

City Wide Plumbing Co. Responds to COVID-19 (coronavirus)

By plumbers

March 16, 2020

To: All Current and Prospective Customers

Subject: Coronavirus Impacts

 

Valued Clients:

As COVID-19 (coronavirus) continues to impact all of us, City Wide Plumbing Co. is monitoring the situation very closely. Like you, our top priorities are the safety of our staff and customers, and doing what we can to minimize the spread of the virus.

Accordingly, we have confirmed that our employees have adhered to the guidelines put in place by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  https://wwwnc.cdc.gov.

Our employees have not:

  • Traveled to at-risk areas, otherwise known as Level 2 and 3 countries https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices, or been exposed to anyone who has traveled to these areas in the past 14 days.
  • Been in known contact with anyone testing positive with the virus in the past 14 days.

As a company, we’ve asked everyone to stay on top of their good practices, and these are excellent reminders for all of us moving forward:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds.
  • When soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol and rub your hands together until the sanitizer air dries.
  • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces every day, such as door knobs, handles, work surfaces, etc.
  • Allow those who are at risk to work from home.
  • Avoid close contact with those who are sick – 6 feet is the recommended distance.
  • Insist on those who are sick to remain at home.

 

City Wide Plumbing Co. wants to assure all of our customers that WE WILL NOT send a technician out who exhibits cold and/or flu symptoms. We provide our employees with sick leave and strongly encourage them to stay home when they aren’t feeling well.

We take safety very seriously and ask all of you to stay safe and know we’re working together for the betterment of our community and our customers.

Best Regards,

Larry

City Wide Plumbing Co. Responds to COVID-19 (coronavirus)
backflow device

What Is Backflow Prevention

By backflow prevention, plumbers

In the simplest terms, backflow prevention maintains the water flow from the water supply lines to your faucets, irrigation lines or hydrants.

It provides a continuous stream of fresh water, and prevents contaminants, such as debris, gases or solids from backing up into your water supply.

Regardless of where your water comes from, a cistern, well or city water plant, you need it to flow in one direction: Clean water comes in, while waste water flows away. The word “backflow” means that the waste water that normally leaves your building is literally flowing back, inadvertently mixing with your clean water. As you can imagine, it’s a sanitation nightmare!

Possible Contaminants in the Drinking Water after a Backflow Assembly Failure

  • Agriculture runoff: fertilizers, pesticides, animal wastes
  • Gray/soapy water discharge: Dishwashers, showers, sinks and washing machines
  • Raw sewage from toilets
  • Chlorine and pool/spa by-products

Backflow Prevention Cage

Backflow can happen in any closed system that includes connections that cross or feed into the water line – a fairly common piping architecture. Cross connections are like street intersections, where a main line branches off into smaller supply lines that pipe water into individual businesses, farms or households. While you, your neighbors and nearby commercial and agricultural facilities may share the same main water supply lines, the differing pipe sizes will depend on the water requirements of each facility.

With varying-sized pipes comes a greater reliance on maintaining a pressurized system. That’s where backflow assemblies come into play. They help keep the pressure evenly distributed to ensure that the water flow moves cleanly from your water supplier and exits back to a waste water treatment center.

So what makes a water system backflow? Low water pressure or even higher water pressure on a portion of the system can be enough to trigger a vacuum. This condition can force contaminated water back into the clean water. When a municipality backflow prevention assembly fails, you’ll be asked to boil all of your drinking water for the next 24-48 hours.
Another reason why a system may experience backflow is when a break in the water main occurs. It literally “opens” the closed water system and causes the water pressure to drop. And when the water pressure drops, the water can back flow.

In the event of a fire, where the local fire hydrant is used, is another cause for backflow. Again, the pressure becomes uneven, which can change the flow of contaminated water.
Backflow assemblies act as a one-way gate. When the water flow maintains its pressure, and the water continues to flow in the appropriate direction, the gate remains open. Conversely, the gate will close when it detects a change in the water flow’s direction. It will still allow clean water to flow into your building, such as when you open a tap or flush a toilet, but the gate will close to prevent any waste water backflow from contaminating your clean water supply. You can think of it as a backflow assembly acting like your water flow traffic cop who keeps the water flowing smoothly on its one-way path.

Even though farms and other more remote locations might have their own systems, a backflow prevention assembly is highly recommended. It will prevent contaminated water, such as fertilizers, pesticides and animal waste runoff from contaminating their clean water, and in some areas, a backflow assembly is mandatory.

Different Types of Backflow

There are two different types of backflow, and their differences are based on how the backflow begins:

  • Back-siphonage backflow occurs when there is a negative pressure that results in a vacuum. It can be cause by a fire hydrant in use or a break in a local water main. A negative pressure creates a vacuum – think about how you drink through a straw. You draw pressure on the straw, and the liquid responds. It travels in the direction of the vacuum you created. When you release the pressure on the straw, the liquid travels back to its “resting” state.
  • Back-pressure backflow is caused by a supply-demand imbalance. When the amount of water being used exceeds the amount of water being supplied, the water pressure can change, creating a backflow. This can happen during droughts or whenever there is a dramatic increase in water use, such as a water main breaks or fire-hydrant use.

Who needs a backflow assembly?

In Phoenix, every commercial building is required to have a backflow assembly. That’s including but not limited to:

  • Industrial and Commercial
  • Restaurants and bars
  • Schools
  • Farms and other agricultural locations
  • Construction sites with potable running water
  • Municipalities such as libraries and other city government buildings
  • Other businesses
  • Residential homes will need a backflow if they have an irrigation system or pool filler but is not required to be annually tested

What kinds of backflow prevention assemblies are available?

There are two kinds of backflow preventers, testable and non-testable. Here is a quick rundown of each one:

Testable backflow is tested annually to ensure its continued reliability. Pieces can be cleaned and/or rebuilt as needed and the system can be retested as needed. They’re usually required on the following more critical applications:

  • In-ground irrigation and fire sprinklers
  • Commercial boilers
  • Medical Equipment and Laboratories
  • Car Washes
  • Soda machine
  • Processing Plants

FYI: Annual testing is required in medical, restaurant and other commercial businesses that must follow health department mandates. Arizona Backflow Prevention can make sure you stay up to date on testing dates and that your backflow prevention is up to code.

Note: Non-testable backflow units cannot be repaired. They must be replaced, and may have a relatively limited operating life span. This type of backflow protection is used as leak-proofing rather than security measures, and you’ll find them on items like:

  • Residential hoses, hand-held shower heads, boilers, fire sprinklers and humidifiers
  • Commercial emergency eye washes, ice makers, beverage dispensers and food service equipment

Who does backflow testing?

Arizona Backflow Prevention makes it easy on you. They will test your backflow assemblies, ensuring that your water supply remains sanitary and up to code. They’ll keep track of your requirements and certification, so you don’t have to. And they’ll repair, replace and install new backflow assemblies, helping preserve your certification.

How long will a backflow assembly last?

A typical backflow assembly will last between three to five years. Arizona Backflow Prevention will keep track of the last time your assembly was tested, and even submit certification on your behalf. They’ll do the testing, the certification and even connect with municipalities who may need to keep track of your business’ codes.

What will cause a backflow preventer to fail?

Backflow assemblies don’t last forever, unfortunately; and there are some key failure causes:
• Hard water is a big culprit of system failure, thanks in part to the naturally occurring sediments and deposits. Over time, they wreak havoc on springs, gates and seals, causing them to seize, rot or lose their flexibility. Any one of these things can result in a depressurized, leaking backflow preventer system.
• Bad weather can also destroy a backflow preventer: Sudden spikes or drops in temperature can cause a backflow assembly to fail. Freezing temperatures can cause a backflow assembly to crack, while a sudden heat wave can expand the seals beyond their capacities.
• Theft is a growing concern – the copper and other metals within the backflow assembly can be seen as valuable to scrappers. A theft prevention device is almost always recommended to help keep your backflow assembly intact and in place.

Do you need a backflow assembly?

  • If you’re a homeowner, you might. If you have an irrigation system or a pool filler you will need one. Check with your local municipality who can guide you on your water supply.
  • If you’re a business in the City of Phoenix, yes.
  • Most businesses that rely on clean, safe, sanitary running water will opt for a backflow assembly.

 

Talk to Arizona Backflow Prevention. Call us today to schedule your evaluation.

Call Today: 480-966-8795

Sump Pump Installation- City Wide Plumbing AZ

Keep Your Area Dry by Having City Wide Plumbing Install Your Sump Pump

By plumbers, sump pump

Standing water is the bane of any commercial building owner.

When no other options are available installing a sump pump can help keep water from accumulating. There are two types of sump pumps named solely on how to locate them: the pedestal pump and the submersible pump. The one we are installing here is a submersible pump. It is called a submersible pump because it is installed under the floor to be flush with the underside of the flooring.

We located the sump in the wash rack area of the building.

This sump pit (the blue basin shown here) is not elaborate but is made of every day plastic and is designed to surround the pump. As the water levels rise to a certain level and fill the pit, the sump is triggered to start pumping. The water is then routed to a sewer ejector drain to exit the building. As the water level drops, the sump automatically shuts off.

This was the least expensive repair for this property owner.

The advantages of a submersible sump pump are that they are quieter, cost effective, take up less room and are usually a good choice for living and working areas as they are well-protected by a concrete slab. The submersible sump is positioned in a hole where the lip of the plastic pit is level with the underside of the concrete. In many cases, a jackhammer will be required to get the depth necessary to house the pit and to handle any excess water drainage.

Sump pit with drain lines coming into it, floor sink for future use. Vent line and ejector line run along wall to sewer main outside.

Sump pit with drain lines coming into it, floor sink for future use. Vent line and ejector line run along wall to sewer main outside.

As depicted in the picture, the sump pits’ location is at least 10 inches away from the walls and the hole is deep enough to accommodate the depth of the pit and is lined with gravel for additional stability.

The three white PVC pipes coming out of the pit include, from left to right, drain lines, a vent line and an ejector line that runs along the wall to the sewer main that is outside. In order to keep the water flowing out and away from the building the PVC must be installed and secured properly. When done correctly, this thorough water re-routing system helps protect the buildings’ walls, floor and footings by keeping water away from the structure. The vent helps prevent an air lock from forming, ensuring water flow.

The sink (the white square object on the far left) is an important part of the sump’s continued operation. It allows owners to pour water directly into the sumps’ pit to make sure the sump is still working. For future use all equipment can be indirectly wasted into floor sinks.

Once the plumbing is completely installed and tested it is ready to be secured by pouring the concrete.

To keep the new floor looking good for years to come, the soil within the hole is tamped down firmly and then lined with steel rebar. Both actions will minimize future soil movement and help keep the concrete from buckling, pitting or cracking.

The rebar set under the piping helps keep the pipe in its proper position even while the concrete is being poured. Later on, it will help minimize floor settling and work to support the new concrete.

The all-new floor drain is positioned specifically to handle any potential sump pump failure and can also handle overflow in the event of heavy rains or discharge.

Things to consider for sump pump installation:

  1. How to handle clogs. The first line of defense is a good offense by keeping the clogs from forming in the first place. You can do this in two ways. The first way is to avoid screened intake lines. The second way is to create a more robust design. As in the picture, this sump pump is elevated on a platform at the bottom of the sump liner. This helps prevent clogs before they start.
  2. More may be better. Installing one sump pump for a big building or a larger water accumulation problem may tax your one-pump sump and cause it to burn out more quickly. Have an expert evaluate how many pumps you will need to move your water out of your living or work space.
  3. Battery backup? When a storm knocks out the power, it typically means your sump will not work. Better systems have a battery backup that will run even when the power is out.
  4. Why insist on cast-iron motor housing? As you can see in the picture, the motor housing is made of cast iron. Typically, we recommend cast iron instead of the less expensive plastic because it tolerates and dissipates heat better than its plastic counterparts. That means you’ll have a longer-lasting motor and less overall expense.

Keep your area dry by having City Wide Plumbing install your sump pump.

Their expertise means they will get it right the first time, have the right equipment and skills to handle the job and understand how to solve your water problems without the additional frustration.

Call City Wide today! 770-872-0867.

water heaters maintenance - Mesa, AZ

Maintenance For Your Water Heater That Keeps You Smiling

By plumbers, water heaters

Taking a shower on-demand is one of life’s little pleasures. When the water temperature isn’t quite right, you want it fixed – quickly!

We have some tips for our residential Mesa, Ahwatukee, and Chandler customers to keep your water flowing, and to help preserve your daily routines.

water heaters maintenance - Mesa, AZ

Cleaning your Water Heater
The average lifespan of your water heater’s tank is about 10 years, but you can help extend its longevity by draining the tank at least once a year.

Tools You’ll Need:

  • A garden hose that’s long enough to reach a nearby drain or suitable exit point for water to go
  • Flat-head screwdriver
  • Old nylon stocking
  • Zip-tie or bread bag wire fastener
  1. Make sure you have a garden hose handy – one that you can connect to the bottom of your tank and that’s long enough to reach a floor drain or another other exit point. A good rule to follow is that water flows downward much more easily, so you’ll want to position the hose’s end so that it’s lower than the tank’s drain point.
  2. Fasten an old nylon stocking over the end of your garden hose with a zip or wire twist tie, giving you an automatic filter. That way, any debris coming from the tank won’t clog your drain or soil your driveway.
  3. First and foremost, turn off the power that goes to the tank. If you have an electric water heater, you’ll want to shut off the breaker that controls the tank’s power source. If you have a gas water heater, you’ll want to use the gas shut-off valve that goes directly to the tank.
  4. The next step you’ll want to take is to shut off the water supply line. Typically, the water shut-off valve is located above the tank.
  5. Then, connect your hose.
  6. At your closest sink, open up the hot water tap and let it run. It’ll help relieve the system pressure inside the tank.
  7. Clear the area around the tank before you open up the drain valve. The hot water from your tank is HOT!
  8. With the hose connected, open up the drain valve on the tank. When the valve is open, the hot water will drain out of the tank.
  9. Once the water is completely out of the tank, close the drain valve and then remove the garden hose. Turn the gas or electricity and your water supply line back on.
  10. Make sure you check how much sediment the nylon stocking caught. If it was a cup or more, flush your hot water tank more often than yearly. If it was about a tablespoon’s worth, then once a year will probably be often enough.

Other adjustments to your water heater that our residential Mesa, Ahwatukee, and Chandler customers can make:

  • Keep your tank’s temperature down to 120 degrees Fahrenheit. A lower temperature helps preserve the life of your tank, saves on your energy costs and helps prevent scalding accidents. It’ll also help you to prevent mold and bacterial growth in the tank – a great way to maintain your home’s water quality.
  • To save energy, use the “Vacation Setting” when you leave for an extended visit. The pilot light stays lit but the water won’t heat.
  • Check the area around your water heater and keep the floor around it clean. You’ll be able to detect excessive rust or other debris buildup in the area that can indicate potential problems.

When water quality is also a concern, you have some options. You can install a whole-house filtration system that filters your water as it comes into the house. That way, you can be assured that the water reaching your water heater is clean, filtered and, by the time it reaches your taps, good tasting. The other added advantage is that it can help extend the life of your appliances, including your water heater, but also a dishwasher or clothes washer, for example. A filter removes these elements before they can damage your appliances.

A whole house water filter can also pair with a water softener, so double check to make sure you have hard water before you add a softener. A water softener dramatically reduces visible spots and your need for heavy detergents when washing dishes and clothes.

A water softener can also help preserve the life of your plumbing and fixtures. It removes the calcium, iron and other deposits that clog pipes and appliances. A water softener helps keep your washer, dishwasher, faucets, shower-heads and toilets running cleanly and smoothly for longer periods of time.

A Reverse Osmosis System (RO) can be a great solution with several advantages:

  • Improves taste, odor and appearance of your water, straight from the tap.
  • Removes pollutants by flushing them away and does not collect them.
  • Consumes no energy.
  • Uses the latest technology to purify your water.
  • Gives you quality water for pennies per gallon.

As plumbers, we go with the flow…and our goal is to improve yours for a better peace of mind.

Call Today: 480-966-8795

The Plumber Who Saved Christmas

By holidays, plumbers No Comments

Plumbing isn’t for the faint of heart. Or amateurs.

( The following is a true story that happened to our friend and content writer: Lisa Butcher)

For three days, we’d wandered around our 110-year old house, trying to find the source of that distinctive sewer smell. It was so strong it made our eyes water. All we wanted to do was get rid of it! We wracked our brains: Maybe the basement drains were too dry and let gas into the house? Maybe the master cleanout needed to be re-snaked? Maybe the main stack was clogged?

A couple of gallons of bleach poured into all of the drains, a re-caulked floor drain, a call to the drain guy who snakes our cleanout valve twice a year, and a call to the stack guy who cleans out the breather valve on our roof, but to no avail. Where was that smell coming from?

It was the day before Christmas and all through the house, we were gagging on air with the windows pushed out. Holy moly, we had to do something. The whole family was coming into town and we expected a houseful of people in less than 24 hours. Did we have to tell them not to come? That we had a house emergency?

We called in the expert: a certified plumber.certified plumber

Our plumber re-snaked the drains, re-checked the air flow in the roof stack and then checked one last thing: the toilet. The toilet is on the second floor. What would happen with a toilet? It flushed fine, most of the time. Sometimes, we had to flush it twice, but other than that, we didn’t notice anything untoward. The plumber insisted, thinking maybe some of those baby wipes were stuck in the works.

By the way, even if those baby wipes say they’re flushable, they’re not. They can get tangled in sewage systems and shut down part of the waste water system for days.

But we didn’t have a baby, we assured him. We didn’t use baby wipes. Even so, he was pretty adamant. He was pulling the toilet. If it was nothing, well, at least we’d know for sure.

After he turned off the water supply, emptied both the tank and bowl, he pulled the toilet out and stared down the sewer pipe. Sure enough, it was blocked, but not by baby wipes or too much toilet paper. There were tree roots in the sewer pipe of a second-story toilet.

Even the plumber was surprised. A second floor was usually well beyond the reach for tree roots. And yet there they were, blocking the draw on the toilet, causing sewer gas to leak from the base of the toilet, down the stairs and into the main rooms of the house.

Our house had been vacant for a couple of years before we took residency. And we’d had a couple of years where the rains were nearly nonexistent. When it was dry, the neighboring trees searched for the best water source they could find: standing water from the toilet in our house.

The plumber snaked the toilet lines just like he would a cleanout valve. Once he was sure the lines were clear, he reset the toilet, turned the water back on and cleaned everything up neatly.

Honestly, we never would’ve imagined tree roots in a second-floor bath. But when you call in an expert, you get the answers and the solutions you need without a lot of wasted time and money.

Christmas went off without a hitch. And our plumber is on our Christmas card list from now on.

When Plumbing Troubles Arise…

By Phoenix Plumbing, plumbers, plumbing repairs No Comments

Call City Wide Plumbing and Service Company when plumbing problems arise!Call City Wide Plumbing for your plumbing repairs and here’s why:

  1. We’re experienced. We’re a full-service plumbing company that’s been in business for more than 33 years. See our testimonials.
  2. We’re family owned. We’re small enough to provide excellent customer service, but still big enough to be there FAST.
  3. Our company is licensed and bonded. We’ll deliver reliable, effective and affordable plumbing service every time, and we have the papers to back it.
  4. We have same-day service. Get one of our experienced plumbers out to your home or business in as little as an hour after you call.
  5. We don’t charge for service calls. We’ll come out, take a look and provide you with a free estimate.
  6. Our estimates are our word. The price you see on our estimate is the price you’ll pay. No surprises.
  7. We make every job as affordable as we can. We charge by the job and not the time.
  8. We treat your home or business with care and respect.
  9. Service taken seriously. Our business relies on your business, and that’s why our plumbers provide 100% satisfaction guaranteed.
  10. If you ever have any concerns, we have an owner you can talk to: Call Tracy at 480-966-8795.

Save

Plumbing Checks You Can Do

By Phoenix Plumbing, plumbers, plumbing tips No Comments
  1. Make sure every water shut-off valve is operational. The worst time to discover that water valvesthey are not working is when you need them. Do you have a lever-controlled shutoff? Or is it a round one? Some types of shutoffs deteriorate from the inside. This occurs when you turn or twist the handle and it moves properly but the inside operation of the valve has gone bad. You should always double check to make sure the water is turned off. Test your shut offs on a regular basis to make sure they turn the water off completely.
  2. Check the discharge hoses from dishwashers, washing machines, ice machines, water filters and reverse osmosis systems. The tubing can crack and develop slow leaks that turn into bigger problems. Catch minor leaks before you have a deluge.
  3. Replace fixture washers as soon as you notice a leak. Turn the water off at the fixture, and then remove the faucet handle. The washer is dark, round and flat, and it sits under the handle to make sure the handle has a tight grip around the shutoff post within the faucet. If the washer looks worn, it is time to replace it.
  4. Take a look at the base of your toilet. Does water seem to build up between the floor and the toilet? It may be time to get a new wax ring. The ring sits between the toilet base and the floor, creating a tight seal. Use the shutoff valves to turn the water supply off and then drain the water from the toilet bowl. Flush the toilet to drain the tank and then empty the bowl again. Remove the fastening caps from the base and unscrew the bolts. Lift the toilet from the floor and examine the wax ring. If it is very thin or worn in spots, replace it.

No one told me not to put that in my garbage disposal.

By garbage disposal, Phoenix Plumbing, plumbers No Comments

Garbage disposal tips 101

Garbage disposals are the ultimate kitchen scrap eater. If you’re thinking about a new garbage disposal or you just got one, there are some tips you’re going to want to follow to keep it running for years to come:

Always run cold water with anything you put down into the disposal. This helps maintain the flow through the pipes, and helps keep the disposal grease free.

Never put grease, chunks of fat or coffee grounds into the garbage disposal. Put grease and fat into a container and then throw it in the trash. Use your coffee grounds around your roses – they’ll thank you!

Put large bones or fruit stones in the trash and protect the blades from dulling prematurely.

Place smaller bones and most fruit and vegetable peels, husks or skin into the disposal, but cut bigger pieces into smaller ones to help the disposal operate more efficiently. Also, especially fibrous corn husks and celery stalks can wrap around the blades, causing jams and other problems.

Put eggshells in limited quantities into the disposal, but use caution. Ground-up eggshells can bind with greasy foods and clog drains. Also, eggshells are great out in the garden!

Even the best disposal can use a little bit of TLC once in a while. To keep blades sharp, pour a tray of ice cubes into the disposal, and then turn the disposal on. The ice sharpens the blades.

To remove odors, pour half a cup of baking soda into the disposal, and follow it up with a cup of apple cider vinegar. Let the mixture foam for a few minutes, and then run the cold water for at least 30 seconds. If you prefer a fresher, citrus scent, you can use half a lemon with the baking soda instead.

Contact us for a quote on a garbage disposal today, and let us help keep your kitchen scraps down to a minimum!

garbage disposal tips

Stop buying water from the store and make your own at home.

By Phoenix Plumbing, plumbers, water filtration systems No Comments

You’re trying to drink more water, but buying bottled water can be costly, plus there’s always the added recycling responsibility with all of those plastic bottles. Plus, how can you be sure of what you’re buying?

You have some options. You can install a whole-house filtration system that filters your water as it comes into the house. That way, you can be assured that the water reaching any faucet or spigot in your home is clean, filtered and good tasting. The other added advantage is that it can help extend the life of your appliances. Rust, sediment, chlorine and other contaminants can wear on the moving parts of water-dependent appliances, like a dishwasher or clothes washer, for example. A filter removes these elements before they can damage your appliances.

A whole house water filter can also pair with a water softener, so double check to make sure you have hard water before you add a softener. Also, like any filter, you’ll have to change it every so often. Check your owner’s manual for recommendations to keep your filter working properly.

Another possible solution is to install an under-sink water filter. Filters fit under the sink, and attach to a dedicated water spigot that operates independently from the rest of the sink taps. The most popular placement choice is in the kitchen, so you can use filtered water for cooking, too. Some people even choose to install a separate filter on their refrigerator’s fill line for the ice maker. That way, the ice comes from a filtered water source, too.

You can choose a spigot style and finish that complements your existing faucet, and installation is usually within an hour. Regular filter changes are required, so check your owner’s manual for details.

Stop buying water from the store and make your own at home. Save money. Save time. And save the recycling for another product.

What should you know before you hire your local plumber?

By local plumber, Phoenix Plumbing, plumbers No Comments

At City Wide Plumbing Service and Company, we want you to know that we value your choices. We want you to know why we are the best choice for you. Take a look at the top ten reasons why we think you should choose City Wide Plumbing.

City Wide Plumbing and Service Company

Ten Reasons to Choose City Wide Plumbing

  1. We’re experienced. We’re a full-service plumbing company that’s been in business for more than 28 years. See our testimonials.
  2. We’re family owned. We’re small enough to provide excellent customer service, but still big enough to be there FAST.
  3. Our company is licensed and bonded. We’ll deliver reliable, effective and affordable plumbing service every time, and we have the papers to back it.
  4. We have same-day service. Get one of our experienced plumbers out to your home or business in as little as an hour after you call.
  5. We don’t charge for service calls. We’ll come out, take a look and provide you with a free estimate.
  6. Our estimates are our word. The price you see on our estimate is the price you’ll pay. No surprises.
  7. We make every job as affordable as we can. We charge by the job and not the time.
  8. We treat your home or business with care and respect.
  9. Service taken seriously. Our business relies on your business, and that’s why our plumbers provide 100% satisfaction guaranteed.
  10. If you ever have any concerns, we have an owner you can talk to: Call Tracy at 480-966-8795.

How is your home warranty company experience?

By home warranty company, local plumber, Phoenix Plumbing, plumbers No Comments

Hi, I’m Stacy the secretary at City Wide Plumbing. As I receive a large quantity of calls from customers I hear a lot about home warranty companies from their perspective. Sometimes it’s good experiences and other times, it’s bad.

My mom for instance has a home warranty company, she had a great experience when it came to replacing her air conditioning unit. The ac company that the home warranty had contracted out was awesome, easy to deal with and everything was covered. My mom only had to pay $65 for the initial service call. She was thrilled.

Her experience on the plumbing side was a completely different story. Her water heater wasn’t heating, she called her home warranty company and they sent out a plumbing contractor (plumber “A”) to assess the situation. She paid the $65 service fee and plumber “A” told her the elements needed to be replaced and it would be covered under warranty. She had the work done and was satisfied. A few days later she had the same issue, her water heater wasn’t heating. So she again called the home warranty company and they sent out plumber “A” and informed her that if it wasn’t an issue with the plumbers work she would have to pay another service fee. She agreed and had them come out again. This time they said the thermostats needed to be replaced and the work would be covered under warranty but she would have to pay the service fee because it wasn’t “related” to the first service call. She again agreed and had the work done. Then a few days later she came home to scalding hot water coming out of her temperature and pressure drain line (T&P). She immediately called her home warranty company and told them she didn’t want to pay to have plumber “A” come back out again she just wanted it fixed. They sent plumber “A” out and told her that her water heater was old and it was “fried” and she needed a new water heater which is covered under warranty. They then proceeded to tell her that the T&P piping was “not to code” and would have to be redone but that was not covered under warranty and would cost over $400 to bring it up to code. She told them no and asked them to leave and then called City Wide.

We sent out one of our City Wide Plumbing technician’s to take a look. He discovered that the water heater failed because plumber “A” did not set the temperature properly on the water heater when he replaced the thermostats. Also there was no “code” issues found with the T&P piping. We replaced the water heater and everything has been working fine ever since.

Over the years I have heard similar stories about different companies techs telling customers that things need to be brought “up to code” and it’s not covered under warranty. Some cases have been true but most have not. Home warranty companies only pay their contractors a certain amount to service these calls. Some of these contractors try to up-sell the customer on additional work not covered by the warranty by telling them it’s “not up to code”. If any contractor gives you that line, shop around, get another opinion before you sign on the dotted line to have to work done.

We invite you to share your good and bad stories about your personal experiences with home warranty companies in the comments.

How safe is your Gas or Electric Water Heater?

By Phoenix Plumbing, plumbers, water heaters No Comments

Protection for your Home Plumbing

Temperature

Hot water can scald you in just a few seconds. The safest hot water heater temperatures are

120 F or lower. Need directions for changing yours?
visit www.cpsc.gov//PageFiles/121522/5098.pdf

Space

Clutter creates a fire risk. It’s best to move objects at least 18 inch

es away from and do not stack items on top of your water heater.

Protection for your Gas and Electric Home Plumbing

Maintenance

Test the safety valve and run hot water through the drain valve once a year. Check your owners manual for complete maintenance instructions and how-to guides.
Can’t find your manual?
Popular Gas Water Heaters Manual

Popular Electric Water Heaters Manual

Still have questions? Call 480-966-8795

Gas Water Heaters for Local Phoenix Service Area

By Gas Water Heaters, Phoenix Plumbing, plumbers No Comments

There is help for local Phoenix residents with Gas water heaters.

If you have a gas water heater and you are not getting any hot water, it usually means the pilot light on your water heater has gone out or your water heater has a malfunctioning part.

If you have tried to light your pilot and it still won’t light give us a call 480-966-8795 and a City Wide Plumbing technician who will diagnose the problem and let you know what the solution is. Most often we have same day service and parts available to fix your water heater.

Call 480-966-8795

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