plumberssump pump

Keep Your Area Dry by Having City Wide Plumbing Install Your Sump Pump

Standing water is the bane of any commercial building owner.

When no other options are available installing a sump pump can help keep water from accumulating. There are two types of sump pumps named solely on how to locate them: the pedestal pump and the submersible pump. The one we are installing here is a submersible pump. It is called a submersible pump because it is installed under the floor to be flush with the underside of the flooring.

We located the sump in the wash rack area of the building.

This sump pit (the blue basin shown here) is not elaborate but is made of every day plastic and is designed to surround the pump. As the water levels rise to a certain level and fill the pit, the sump is triggered to start pumping. The water is then routed to a sewer ejector drain to exit the building. As the water level drops, the sump automatically shuts off.

This was the least expensive repair for this property owner.

The advantages of a submersible sump pump are that they are quieter, cost effective, take up less room and are usually a good choice for living and working areas as they are well-protected by a concrete slab. The submersible sump is positioned in a hole where the lip of the plastic pit is level with the underside of the concrete. In many cases, a jackhammer will be required to get the depth necessary to house the pit and to handle any excess water drainage.

Sump pit with drain lines coming into it, floor sink for future use. Vent line and ejector line run along wall to sewer main outside.

Sump pit with drain lines coming into it, floor sink for future use. Vent line and ejector line run along wall to sewer main outside.

As depicted in the picture, the sump pits’ location is at least 10 inches away from the walls and the hole is deep enough to accommodate the depth of the pit and is lined with gravel for additional stability.

The three white PVC pipes coming out of the pit include, from left to right, drain lines, a vent line and an ejector line that runs along the wall to the sewer main that is outside. In order to keep the water flowing out and away from the building the PVC must be installed and secured properly. When done correctly, this thorough water re-routing system helps protect the buildings’ walls, floor and footings by keeping water away from the structure. The vent helps prevent an air lock from forming, ensuring water flow.

The sink (the white square object on the far left) is an important part of the sump’s continued operation. It allows owners to pour water directly into the sumps’ pit to make sure the sump is still working. For future use all equipment can be indirectly wasted into floor sinks.

Once the plumbing is completely installed and tested it is ready to be secured by pouring the concrete.

To keep the new floor looking good for years to come, the soil within the hole is tamped down firmly and then lined with steel rebar. Both actions will minimize future soil movement and help keep the concrete from buckling, pitting or cracking.

The rebar set under the piping helps keep the pipe in its proper position even while the concrete is being poured. Later on, it will help minimize floor settling and work to support the new concrete.

The all-new floor drain is positioned specifically to handle any potential sump pump failure and can also handle overflow in the event of heavy rains or discharge.

Things to consider for sump pump installation:

  1. How to handle clogs. The first line of defense is a good offense by keeping the clogs from forming in the first place. You can do this in two ways. The first way is to avoid screened intake lines. The second way is to create a more robust design. As in the picture, this sump pump is elevated on a platform at the bottom of the sump liner. This helps prevent clogs before they start.
  2. More may be better. Installing one sump pump for a big building or a larger water accumulation problem may tax your one-pump sump and cause it to burn out more quickly. Have an expert evaluate how many pumps you will need to move your water out of your living or work space.
  3. Battery backup? When a storm knocks out the power, it typically means your sump will not work. Better systems have a battery backup that will run even when the power is out.
  4. Why insist on cast-iron motor housing? As you can see in the picture, the motor housing is made of cast iron. Typically, we recommend cast iron instead of the less expensive plastic because it tolerates and dissipates heat better than its plastic counterparts. That means you’ll have a longer-lasting motor and less overall expense.

Keep your area dry by having City Wide Plumbing install your sump pump.

Their expertise means they will get it right the first time, have the right equipment and skills to handle the job and understand how to solve your water problems without the additional frustration.

Call City Wide today! 770-872-0867.

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