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plumbingcheckLow-flow shower head? Check.

plumbingcheckFront-load washer? Check.

plumbingcheck Faucet aerators? Check, too.

You’ve upgraded a lot of fixtures and appliances to save on water, but if a new toilet isn’t near the top of your high-efficiency list, you may want to reconsider. For example, older toilets from before the 1980s used as much as 7 gallons for every flush. Installing a new toilet that uses 1.6 gallons per flush (gpf) means you’d use 77% less water per flush! That translates into a great cost savings that can pay for itself in less than five years.Plumbing mistakes cost you.

But what if you already replaced your toilet in the early 90s and it’s still working well? Besides, it’s a smaller toilet, holding about 3.5 gallons – a full half of what your old toilet used – and it flushes the bowl the first time.

The truth is that some engineering tweaks made all of the difference in how well low-flow toilets flush. For example, the toilet’s trap that opens when you flush has been enlarged. The larger opening allows more waste to move through the opening more quickly. Also, new toilets use a mechanism to increase the water pressure and help clear the bowl after one flush. Some use an air-pressure system; others use a pump. Both systems require only a single flush to clear the bowl.

Contact us today, and we can help you make an informed choice on a new, low-flow toilet that best fits your needs.

 

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